One of these things is not like the others

Anybody that has seen Sesame Street is probably familiar with these lyrics:

One of these things is not like the others,
One of these things just doesn’t belong,
Can you tell which thing is not like the others
By the time I finish my song?
Did you guess which thing was not like the others?
Did you guess which thing just doesn’t belong?
If you guessed this one is not like the others,
Then you’re absolutely…right!

Given that, let’s look at the four men involved in the presidential campaign.  President Obama, Governor Romney, and Representative Ryan seem to have no problem with being passionate while staying mature and civil.  Then there’s Joe.  I don’t get it.  His boss isn’t modeling that sort of behavior.  His opponents don’t behave that way.  Why is it OK for Joe?

I put the four men’s behavior to a simple test.  Would I tell a ten-year-old to behave like the person on stage?  The three men I mentioned would easily pass that test.  Biden interrupted Ryan and the moderator 81 times.  If a child interrupted his or her teacher one tenth that many time, that child would be in the principal’s office.  Furthermore, if Biden is so comfortable with being so rude, what is to say he won’t cross one too many lines when he is outside of the debate hall?

Lastly, shame on my fellow native from Queens, NY, Debbie Wasserman-Schultz, who said that Mr. Biden was behaving “vice-presidentially.”  Since when does rudeness and sarcasm make someone vice-presidential?  She is a mom.  Would she really tolerate her kids behaving during a school debate like Mr. Biden did?  I doubt it.  She said that Mr. Biden was demonstrating gravitas.  She needs to get her Latin straight.  Mr. Biden was showing he is an asinus.

Daddy, there’s a bully at school

Child: Daddy, there’s a bully at school!

Father:  Why do you say he’s a bully?

Child:  He doesn’t let other people talk.

Father:  Does he do that all of the time?

Child:  Yesterday, my friend dropped a marble in a jar every time he didn’t let the teacher or one of us talk.

Father:  How many marbles were in the jar?

Child:  81

Father:  What else does this bully do?

Child:  He lies.

Father:  What does he lie about?

Child:  There was this really bad third grader who was waiting around the corner and then he ran out and crashed into a teacher.

Father: So what was the lie?

Child: Well, the bully saw the third grader getting ready to crash into the teacher and when the principal asked a bunch of us if we knew what happened and the bully said he didn’t.

Father:  This sounds like a very bad boy.  Is there anything else the he does?

Child:  Yeah.  You know how you teach me how important it is to be nice to people and not say mean things, even if I don’t like them?

Father:  Yes.  That’s very important.

Child:  Well the bully isn’t like that.  He laughs at people and makes fun of them.  There’s something else.

Father:  OK.

Child:  You know how you said it is bad to use words that are just make believe for bad words just so we don’t get in trouble?

Father:  Sure.  That’s important because what really matters is what you think, not just what you say.

Child:  The bully uses words that mean…poop…a lot.

Father:  This boy is a bully.  What does he look like?  I’m going to school and talk to the principal.

Child: He looks like this: